tsuki-nekota:

ubersaur:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

atomic-glitter:

boneswolf:

norcumi:

ladiesplusjunk:

that’s how you make armor for women, no bullshit boob cups.

Just beautiful.

want

Boob cups must be the most uncomfortable things on earth… What the hell are you supposed to do when one of your boobs slips out? Let’s say you inhale or move your chest somehow so your breasts get free from the cup and end up clipped on the edge?? You can’t even pull them like you can when your bra gets all screwed up! Like who wants to wear that while they’re fighting monsters and shit?

I hit reblog so hard I may have sprained my finger

boob cups could also kill you. If you fall on your chest, all your weight will be on the middle of the boob cups and your sternum could be crushed. bye bye heart.

and the fact that this is the Mulan from “Once Upon a Time” makes it even better

Like this design. :D

tsuki-nekota:

ubersaur:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

atomic-glitter:

boneswolf:

norcumi:

ladiesplusjunk:

that’s how you make armor for women, no bullshit boob cups.

Just beautiful.

want

Boob cups must be the most uncomfortable things on earth… What the hell are you supposed to do when one of your boobs slips out? Let’s say you inhale or move your chest somehow so your breasts get free from the cup and end up clipped on the edge?? You can’t even pull them like you can when your bra gets all screwed up! Like who wants to wear that while they’re fighting monsters and shit?

I hit reblog so hard I may have sprained my finger

boob cups could also kill you. If you fall on your chest, all your weight will be on the middle of the boob cups and your sternum could be crushed. bye bye heart.

and the fact that this is the Mulan from “Once Upon a Time” makes it even better

Like this design. :D

(Source: crazybitcharoundhere)

Steve Ahn Reel Sample _ 03 from Steve Ahn on Vimeo.

steveahn:

Storyboard Animatic 
from Ben 10 Omniverse, "Blukic and Driba Go to Area 51" 

good for reference. :D

"Less than 15% of venture-backed companies have a female founder, but Indiegogo says 47% of campaigns that reach their funding target are run by women [….] On Kickstarter, a similar platform to Indiegogo, roughly two-thirds of women-led tech firms reached their fundraising goals compared with 30 percent of tech companies with male founders."

Fortune Magazine this morning, helping Indiegogo —a tech company with a staff that is 45% female — refute the idea that there’s no female talent in the tech industry. (x)

I enjoy reading Fortune’s coverage of the gender/race gap in the tech industry because they rarely ask “where are the women?” and instead run stories saying “We know you don’t have any women on staff, but look, here the women are, they’re right here, and they’re actually doing better work than the men right now, so maybe you should think about employing a few.”

(via copperbadge)

Way to go, ladies! As a company that has run three successful Kickstarters so far, I’m proud of us. 

(via sparklermonthly)

Awesome news. 

Anonymous Asked
QuestionSekai project is doing a prefundia for their Grisaia visual novel kickstarter might want to check it out to learn how to build pre-kickstarter hype for a project Answer

Thanks! Appreciate the reference. I will make a note on it. :) 

kingofhispaniola:

Do yall even know the history of braids
kingofhispaniola:

Do yall even know the history of braids
kingofhispaniola:

Do yall even know the history of braids
kingofhispaniola:

Do yall even know the history of braids

kingofhispaniola:

Do yall even know the history of braids

(Source: pickyheadology)

Anonymous Asked
QuestionWhen can we expect the kickstarter campaign for the visual novel be sure to check Crowdcrux's 20+ Tools to Help you Run a Crowdfunding Campaign its missing crowdfundingpr and kicktraq. Answer

I am estimating summer 2015 atm while hoping for Spring 2015, lol.  

Since I am very much tied down to a freelance job until pass nov. The planning is slowly coming along. I plan on having the next campaign to be much simpler so hopefully it’s not going to take as long to put it together. Right now just focusing on the content. 

rogosketchblog:

extraextraex:

pretty tired of seeing this hair trope on asian characters

EDIT: because three examples wasn’t enough for some of you:

Wow… that’s a trope I didn’t even realize was a trope…

I mean I like that look but… why is it *this* common? Yeesh. o.o

LOL our black hair is boring or what? Must have highlight!

johnagbaje:

the forest comes alive by the beat of the drum.

aftertouchs:

hawkelahawke:

Firaxis Games’ concept artist Sang Han Sang on how to give your digital art a traditional look and feel. [source]
00. BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Many people have tried using brushes that simulate analogue bristles, but they may not have thought about how the paint is applied. Traditional painters take great care in applying each stroke of paint, which has been thoughtfully blended to the right colour and value on a palette.
Since the digital medium is so fast and forgiving, we tend to dive right in without much thought and noodle around until something happens. I think this leads to muddy colours, and the energy of the initial gesture gets lost.

01. SKETCH IT OUT

I begin with a rough sketch, trying to keep it loose and gestural. It’s difficult to think about design, colour, lighting and composition all in one pass so I break it down into steps and keep it simple at the beginning. These early steps are important because not only are they the foundation for an entire painting, but some of these strokes may show through in the finished work.

02. LAYER IT UP

Here I create a new layer and change the mode to Multiply. I then paint on this layer with a colour that resembles yellow ochre or burnt sienna. This will help to gauge value and colour more easily than if it was a white canvas. I could have simply filled the layer with a flat colour, but again, the painted strokes may show through and add to the final painting.

03. RENDERING

In this step, I block in the local colours and start rendering. As I do this, I try to remember not to overly blend or noodle around too much, as mentioned above. One of my goals is to retain the energy of each brush-stroke and put paint down with a sense of conviction. Sometimes I put a single stroke down, undo it and repeat this process many times until I’m satisfied.

04. LEAVE MARKS

Keep in mind that you don’t have to render everything. You’ll notice in traditional paintings, certain details are kept as abstract marks. This adds another level of interest to the viewer. As you get closer to the end of the painting, lay the strokes down with lower opacity to give the effect of thicker paint. I like to do this when rendering certain accents, such as highlights.


I need this like burning.
aftertouchs:

hawkelahawke:

Firaxis Games’ concept artist Sang Han Sang on how to give your digital art a traditional look and feel. [source]
00. BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Many people have tried using brushes that simulate analogue bristles, but they may not have thought about how the paint is applied. Traditional painters take great care in applying each stroke of paint, which has been thoughtfully blended to the right colour and value on a palette.
Since the digital medium is so fast and forgiving, we tend to dive right in without much thought and noodle around until something happens. I think this leads to muddy colours, and the energy of the initial gesture gets lost.

01. SKETCH IT OUT

I begin with a rough sketch, trying to keep it loose and gestural. It’s difficult to think about design, colour, lighting and composition all in one pass so I break it down into steps and keep it simple at the beginning. These early steps are important because not only are they the foundation for an entire painting, but some of these strokes may show through in the finished work.

02. LAYER IT UP

Here I create a new layer and change the mode to Multiply. I then paint on this layer with a colour that resembles yellow ochre or burnt sienna. This will help to gauge value and colour more easily than if it was a white canvas. I could have simply filled the layer with a flat colour, but again, the painted strokes may show through and add to the final painting.

03. RENDERING

In this step, I block in the local colours and start rendering. As I do this, I try to remember not to overly blend or noodle around too much, as mentioned above. One of my goals is to retain the energy of each brush-stroke and put paint down with a sense of conviction. Sometimes I put a single stroke down, undo it and repeat this process many times until I’m satisfied.

04. LEAVE MARKS

Keep in mind that you don’t have to render everything. You’ll notice in traditional paintings, certain details are kept as abstract marks. This adds another level of interest to the viewer. As you get closer to the end of the painting, lay the strokes down with lower opacity to give the effect of thicker paint. I like to do this when rendering certain accents, such as highlights.


I need this like burning.
aftertouchs:

hawkelahawke:

Firaxis Games’ concept artist Sang Han Sang on how to give your digital art a traditional look and feel. [source]
00. BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Many people have tried using brushes that simulate analogue bristles, but they may not have thought about how the paint is applied. Traditional painters take great care in applying each stroke of paint, which has been thoughtfully blended to the right colour and value on a palette.
Since the digital medium is so fast and forgiving, we tend to dive right in without much thought and noodle around until something happens. I think this leads to muddy colours, and the energy of the initial gesture gets lost.

01. SKETCH IT OUT

I begin with a rough sketch, trying to keep it loose and gestural. It’s difficult to think about design, colour, lighting and composition all in one pass so I break it down into steps and keep it simple at the beginning. These early steps are important because not only are they the foundation for an entire painting, but some of these strokes may show through in the finished work.

02. LAYER IT UP

Here I create a new layer and change the mode to Multiply. I then paint on this layer with a colour that resembles yellow ochre or burnt sienna. This will help to gauge value and colour more easily than if it was a white canvas. I could have simply filled the layer with a flat colour, but again, the painted strokes may show through and add to the final painting.

03. RENDERING

In this step, I block in the local colours and start rendering. As I do this, I try to remember not to overly blend or noodle around too much, as mentioned above. One of my goals is to retain the energy of each brush-stroke and put paint down with a sense of conviction. Sometimes I put a single stroke down, undo it and repeat this process many times until I’m satisfied.

04. LEAVE MARKS

Keep in mind that you don’t have to render everything. You’ll notice in traditional paintings, certain details are kept as abstract marks. This adds another level of interest to the viewer. As you get closer to the end of the painting, lay the strokes down with lower opacity to give the effect of thicker paint. I like to do this when rendering certain accents, such as highlights.


I need this like burning.
aftertouchs:

hawkelahawke:

Firaxis Games’ concept artist Sang Han Sang on how to give your digital art a traditional look and feel. [source]
00. BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Many people have tried using brushes that simulate analogue bristles, but they may not have thought about how the paint is applied. Traditional painters take great care in applying each stroke of paint, which has been thoughtfully blended to the right colour and value on a palette.
Since the digital medium is so fast and forgiving, we tend to dive right in without much thought and noodle around until something happens. I think this leads to muddy colours, and the energy of the initial gesture gets lost.

01. SKETCH IT OUT

I begin with a rough sketch, trying to keep it loose and gestural. It’s difficult to think about design, colour, lighting and composition all in one pass so I break it down into steps and keep it simple at the beginning. These early steps are important because not only are they the foundation for an entire painting, but some of these strokes may show through in the finished work.

02. LAYER IT UP

Here I create a new layer and change the mode to Multiply. I then paint on this layer with a colour that resembles yellow ochre or burnt sienna. This will help to gauge value and colour more easily than if it was a white canvas. I could have simply filled the layer with a flat colour, but again, the painted strokes may show through and add to the final painting.

03. RENDERING

In this step, I block in the local colours and start rendering. As I do this, I try to remember not to overly blend or noodle around too much, as mentioned above. One of my goals is to retain the energy of each brush-stroke and put paint down with a sense of conviction. Sometimes I put a single stroke down, undo it and repeat this process many times until I’m satisfied.

04. LEAVE MARKS

Keep in mind that you don’t have to render everything. You’ll notice in traditional paintings, certain details are kept as abstract marks. This adds another level of interest to the viewer. As you get closer to the end of the painting, lay the strokes down with lower opacity to give the effect of thicker paint. I like to do this when rendering certain accents, such as highlights.


I need this like burning.

aftertouchs:

hawkelahawke:

Firaxis Games’ concept artist Sang Han Sang on how to give your digital art a traditional look and feel. [source]

00. BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Many people have tried using brushes that simulate analogue bristles, but they may not have thought about how the paint is applied. Traditional painters take great care in applying each stroke of paint, which has been thoughtfully blended to the right colour and value on a palette.

Since the digital medium is so fast and forgiving, we tend to dive right in without much thought and noodle around until something happens. I think this leads to muddy colours, and the energy of the initial gesture gets lost.

01. SKETCH IT OUT

I begin with a rough sketch, trying to keep it loose and gestural. It’s difficult to think about design, colour, lighting and composition all in one pass so I break it down into steps and keep it simple at the beginning. These early steps are important because not only are they the foundation for an entire painting, but some of these strokes may show through in the finished work.

02. LAYER IT UP

Here I create a new layer and change the mode to Multiply. I then paint on this layer with a colour that resembles yellow ochre or burnt sienna. This will help to gauge value and colour more easily than if it was a white canvas. I could have simply filled the layer with a flat colour, but again, the painted strokes may show through and add to the final painting.

03. RENDERING

In this step, I block in the local colours and start rendering. As I do this, I try to remember not to overly blend or noodle around too much, as mentioned above. One of my goals is to retain the energy of each brush-stroke and put paint down with a sense of conviction. Sometimes I put a single stroke down, undo it and repeat this process many times until I’m satisfied.

04. LEAVE MARKS

Keep in mind that you don’t have to render everything. You’ll notice in traditional paintings, certain details are kept as abstract marks. This adds another level of interest to the viewer. As you get closer to the end of the painting, lay the strokes down with lower opacity to give the effect of thicker paint. I like to do this when rendering certain accents, such as highlights.

I need this like burning.

zeiva:

Cover for Voice from the Sea CD - Standard Edition.

For those who hasn’t tried yet, you can play the game here: http://www.zeiva.net/games/voices.html

Forgot to mention, you can get the CD from my online shop: http://zeiva.net/shop_disc.html

It’s a game that brightens your day, it feels…sooo happy. XD